Vaccinations for your baby and toddler

Make sure to vaccinate your baby early to make sure their immune system is strong! Vaccinations are important to protect your baby from serious diseases that can be prevented through vaccines. These diseases that can be prevented can cause serious illness and possibly death.

What are vaccines?

Vaccines are safe and do not cause any other diseases. Vaccine are weakened or killed virus/bacteria of that disease. Since it is a weakened or killed virus/bacteria the body can easily protect itself and defend the body from that disease. Once the immune system defends this vaccine, the body will recognize this virus and bacteria and will know how to fight it off again in the future, if the child comes into contact with it again.

When to get the vaccines for your child

First year vaccinations

At 2 and 4 months old, babies should receive the following vaccines:

  • diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b
  • pneumococcal conjugate
  • rotavirus

At 6 months old, babies should receive the following vaccine:

  • diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b

At 12 months old, babies should receive the following vaccines:

  • pneumococcal conjugate
  • meningococcal conjugate (Men-C-C)
  • measles, mumps and rubella

Second year vaccinations

At 15 months old, babies should receive the following vaccine:

  • chickenpox (varicella)

At 18 months old, babies should receive the following vaccine:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b

Some vaccines require a booster shot which means they have to get another dose of the vaccine to make sure that they are still protected.

It is the Law

It is the law that children who attend school have immunizations against certain diseases. They get these immunizations through the vaccinations they received when they were younger.

  • diphtheria
  • tetanus
  • polio
  • measles
  • mumps
  • rubella
  • meningococcal disease
  • whooping cough (pertussis)
  • chickenpox (varicella) – required for children born in 2010 or later

There can be exemptions for getting immunizations and you will have to talk to a local Public Health unit. These kids will be at an increased risk of diseases and they may be removed from school if the disease is present during school.

Your doctor or health care provider will keep a record of all the vaccines, doses, boosters and dates that your child received the vaccination. If you need access to this record, for example to show proof of vaccinations to the school, contact your health care provider or if you are unsure of the status of the vaccinations.